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Grief and Loss

 

Grief and Loss 

Coping with the loss of someone or something you love is one of life’s biggest challenges. Often, the pain of loss can feel overwhelming.
What is grief?
Grief is a natural response to loss. It’s the emotional suffering you feel when something or someone you love is taken away. The more significant the loss, the more intense your grief will be. You may associate grieving with the death of a loved one—which is often the cause of the most intense type of grief—but any loss can cause grief, including:
Divorce or relationship breakup, Loss of health, Losing a job, Loss of financial stability, A miscarriage, Retirement, Death of a pet, Loss of a cherished dream, A loved one's serious illness, Loss of a friendship, Loss of safety after a trauma, or Selling the family home
Even subtle losses in life can trigger a sense of grief. For example, you might grieve after moving away from home, graduating from college, or changing jobs. Whatever your loss, it’s personal to you, so don’t feel ashamed about how you feel, or believe that it’s somehow only appropriate to grieve for certain things. If the person, animal, relationship, or situation was significant to you, it’s normal to grieve the loss you’re experiencing. To read more about Coping with Grief and Loss go to https://www.helpguide.org/articles/grief/coping-with-grief-and-loss.htm
TedTalks
A video game to cope with grief: When Amy Green's young son was diagnosed with a rare brain tumor, she made up a bedtime story for his siblings to teach them about cancer. What resulted was a video game, "That Dragon, Cancer," which takes players on a journey they can't win. In this beautiful talk about coping with loss, Green brings joy and play to tragedy. "We made a game that's hard to play," she says, "because the hardest moments of our lives change us more than any goal we could ever accomplish." https://www.ted.com/talks/amy_green_a_video_game_to_cope_with_grief
What makes life worth living in the face of death: In this deeply moving talk, Lucy Kalanithi reflects on life and purpose, sharing the story of her late husband, Paul, a young neurosurgeon who turned to writing after his terminal cancer diagnosis. "Engaging in the full range of experience -- living and dying, love and loss -- is what we get to do," Kalanithi says. "Being human doesn't happen despite suffering -- it happens within it." https://www.ted.com/talks/lucy_kalanithi_what_makes_life_worth_living_in_the_face_of_death
We need a heroic narrative for death: Amanda Bennett and her husband were passionate and full of life all throughout their lives together -- and up until the final days, too. Bennett gives a sweet yet powerful talk on why, for the loved ones of the dying, having hope for a happy ending shouldn't warrant a diagnosis of "denial." She calls for a more heroic narrative for death -- to match the ones we have in life. https://www.ted.com/talks/amanda_bennett_a_heroic_narrative_for_letting_go
Let’s talk about death: We can't control if we'll die, but we can "occupy death," in the words of Peter Saul, an emergency doctor. He asks us to think about the end of our lives -- and to question the modern model of slow, intubated death in hospital. Two big questions can help you start this tough conversation. https://www.ted.com/talks/peter_saul_let_s_talk_about_dying
What really matters at the end of life At the end of our lives, what do we most wish for? For many, it's simply comfort, respect, love. BJ Miller is a hospice and palliative medicine physician who thinks deeply about how to create a dignified, graceful end of life for his patients. Take the time to savor this moving talk, which asks big questions about how we think on death and honor life. https://www.ted.com/talks/bj_miller_what_really_matters_at_the_end_of_life
Articles
Saying Goodbye; Coping with a loved one’s terminal illness https://www.helpguide.org/harvard/saying-goodbye.htm